Tag Archives: encryption

FROST: Forensic Recovery Of Scrambled Telephones

A ready to go cold boot attack for a Galaxy Nexus!
Your Android PIN does not protect you.

We present FROST, a tool set that supports the forensic recovery of scrambled telephones. To this end we perform cold boot attacks against Android smartphones and retrieve disk encryption keys from RAM. We show that cold boot attacks against Android phones are generally possible for the first time, and we perform our attacks practically against Galaxy Nexus devices from Samsung. To break disk encryption, the bootloader must be unlocked before the attack because scrambled user partitions are wiped during unlocking. However, we show that cold boot attacks are more generic and allow to retrieve sensitive information, such as contact lists, visited web sites, and photos, directly from RAM, even though the bootloader is locked.

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Breaking Full-Disk Encryption Using FireWire

There have been a number of proof-of-concept hacks using IEEE1394 devices’ DMA to elevate privileges on a host machine.
The most useful application of this technique is breaking into machines that use full-disk encryption. Now there is a tool that will run from any Unix-Like host (Linux, OSX) and can unlock Windows XP,Vista,7,8,OSX 10.6,10.7,10.8, Ubuntu on both x86 and x64 hosts.

Inception is a FireWire physical memory manipulation and hacking tool exploiting IEEE 1394 SBP-2 DMA. The tool can unlock (any password accepted) and escalate privileges to Administrator/root on almost any machine you have physical access to.

It is primarily intended to do its magic against computers that utilize full disk encryption such as BitLocker, FileVault, TrueCrypt or Pointsec. There are plenty of other (and better) ways to hack a machine that doesn’t pack encryption. Inception is also useful for incident response teams and digital forensics experts when faced with live machines.

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Side Channel Attacks

An interesting read on side channel attacks:

“The second story was about USB devices. Basically, they plugged a very precise voltmeter into an USB port and started recording the very small variations between 4.999V and 5V. With the same assembly-test-program-pattern-matching approach, they broke RSA again.” Link.

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